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Curtin University of Technology
John Curtin Gallery

Exhibitions & Events Archive - 2005


Emily Floyd: The Outsider
16 September - 9 December 2005

Emily Floyd, The Outsider, 2005, painted wood installation, dimensions variable, photo: courtesy Anna Schwartz Gallery

Emily Floyd, The Outsider, 2005, painted wood installation, dimensions variable, image courtesy Anna Schwartz Gallery

The Outsider by Emily Floyd is a floor-based installation that creates - in alphabet letters and simple architectural components - an analogue representation of the city of Algiers with fragments of text from one of the great novels set there: L'étranger (The Outsider) by Albert Camus.

View the following web site for more information on Emily Floyd.

A copy of the Emily Floyd catalogue can be downloaded here (2.6MB PDF file).


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Ben Joel: Instrumental
16 September - 9 December 2005

Ben Joel, ROLAND II 2005 Archival Hybrid Giclee Print, 110x33 cm, designed by Ben Joel, made in collaboration with Andrzej Borzyskowski

Ben Joel, ROLAND II 2005 Archival Hybrid Giclee Print, 110x33 cm, designed by Ben Joel, made in collaboration with Andrzej Borzyskowski, courtesy of the Artist

Over the past decade Ben Joel has run his interest in digital and painted images in tandem, with frequent merging and interconnections. The ability to generate and/or hybridise digital with physical images has been instrumental in his most recent experiments exploring the visual, musical and structural possibilities of his paintings.


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Frances Blythe & Michael Wise: Department of Art Postgraduate Student’s Exhibition
16 September – 9 December 2005

Frances Blythe, Lapping, 2004, oil on canvas, photo: courtesy of the artist

Frances Blythe, Lapping, 2004, oil on canvas, courtesy of the Artist

 

Michael Wise, Book of Leaves, detail, 2005, mixed media, photo: courtesy of the artist

Michael Wise, Book of Leaves, detail, 2005, mixed media, courtesy of the Artist

 

Featuring works by Frances Blythe and Michael Wise the exhibition showcases the works of recent graduates from the Department of Art in the Faculty of Built Environment, Art & Design at Curtin University of Technology.

Blythe's paintings are inspired by glimpses of materials/surfaces/objects seen ‘underfoot’ in the usual areas that she visits daily. Often these were glimpses of traces left behind: traces of watermarks, shadows, tracks, and thrown/abandoned objects. These are overlooked things that often evoke absence and act as reminders of the ephemeral nature of all things. The materiality of paint has been used as a response to the images found and as the starting point for an investigation into how the language of paint can be used to lead the viewer into the open possibilities of a painting. While Wise's work, the Book of Leaves, evolved from its original purpose of mass-producing artefacts for a future relational art project to an artwork in its own right that is based on a series of life symbols.


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11: Alison Johnson, Danielle Steele, Eunjeong Jeon, Fong-Yeng Soon & Katrine Borgenvik
24 October - 11 November 2005

Eunjeong Jeon artwork image

Eunjeong Jeon, The Sprituality of No. 11, 2005, engraved cherry wood, 13x13x42cm, courtesy of the Artist

This exhibition is a part of a second semester theory unit for postgraduate diploma students in the Department of Art in which they are required to participate in and curate an exhibition. The aim of this project is to give the students an opportunity to develop skills in curatorial practice as well as further their abilities in writing for the visual arts.

The title 11 has been chosen since the last day of the exhibition, the 11 November, coincides with the annual Humanities Postgraduate Research Conference, day of provocation. In keeping with this day, the students believe that art provides a unique vehicle for provoking thought and challenging ideas. Together they decided the title offered them the freedom to pursue their own research interests, yet it was also definitive enough to distinguish them as a collective group.

The five exhibitors, Alison Johnson, Danielle Steele, Eunjeong Jeon, Fong-Yeng Soon and Katrine Borgenvik, have explored the concept of eleven from various perspectives. For some it has deep symbolic meaning derived from their research into metaphysics and numerology, while for others the visual appearance of the number has been a springboard for their investigations.


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Pantjiti Mary Mclean and Nalda Searles artwork image

Pantjiti Mary Mclean and Nalda Searles Mungangka Kaninytjarra (Under night time), 2001, acrylic paint on dessan paper, 120x250cm, Curtin University of Technology Art Collection, purchased 2001


Indigenous Art + Healing
22 July – 2 September 2005>

Many Indigenous communities have a unique relationship between art and healing in which rather than being separate, art is integrated within all aspects of life and valued for its social and religious significance, not just its visual appeal. Within Indigenous communities healers and artists are viewed in a similar way. Their role demands a level of respect, but it is not necessarily an independent occupation: to be a healer, or artist, is to participate and assist in the health and well-being of the community.
This exhibition showcases works from the Curtin University of Technology Art Collection, the private collection of Dr Jo Lagerberg and Stephen Swift and works on Loan from Dr Ian Bernadt, that reflect the relationship between traditional Indigenous healing techniques and art practices within Indigenous communities across the Western half of Australia.

Drawn together by their visual portrayal of land and spiritual well-being the works in the exhibition represent the diversity of Indigenous culture. Artists working within cities and in remote communities throughout the western half of the country acknowledge the continuity of connection that simultaneously embodies a respect for the past whilst containing a vision for the future.

 


BEAP

BEAPworks
Biennale of Electronic Arts Perth
10 February - 12 June 2005
www.beap.org

The John Curtin Gallery will become an experimental research laboratory for six local new media artists when they present the outcomes of their BEAPworks research and development grant. The artists Mark Cypher, Cat Hope, Jo Law with Hilary Bunt and Raoul Marks, Cameron Merton & Yvette Merton, Nina Sellars with Iain Sweetman & Gareth Lockett, and Cynthia Verspaget, will encourage viewers to interact with their new work and explore the way the world is shaped by emergent technologies.

The local artists featured in BEAPworks investigate the nexus between art, science and technology through their interactive multimedia installations. Their works will provide an avenue for understanding how scientific developments affect our perception of daily life. Their innovative projects will include Mark Cypher’s poetic and performative examination of every living things’ need to connect with others – even a different life-form; Cat Hope’s ‘framed artwork’ will confront us with our lack of awareness of environmental sounds around us; while Jo Law’s large-scale projection with 3d compositions by Hilary Bunt and Raoul Marks will deal with memory and consciousness; Cameron Merton and Yvette Merton’s fictional world will reference largely invisible phenomena that co-habitates with us. While Nina Sellars, working with Iain Sweetman and Gareth Lockett, will reinterpret Michelangelo’s fresco The Creation of Adam from the Sistine Chapel as a meditation on reimagining the natural body; Finally Cynthia Verspaget’s Terrasinda plays with ideas of self imposed surveillance and augmented space in a pseudo gaming environment.

Paul Thomas, director of BEAP and curator of the BEAPworks exhibition sees himself as a convenor, bringing together seemingly disparate concepts through curatorial dialogue. This approach by Thomas is creating an environment where artists can reflect on their research individually and collectively. This approach is being harnessed with the support of the John Curtin Gallery and its noted reputation for excellence in exhibition presentation, particularly in the field of new media artworks.

Paul Thomas hopes the BEAPworks exhibition will also engage the community, industry, scientists and engineers, by displaying the creative output of the BEAPworks artists and hence allude to possible future uses of their own research. Thomas sees BEAPworks as more than an exhibition but an event displaying Intellectual Property and creativity in electronic arts. Hopefully this will entice scientists and engineers to consider the inclusion of artists as part of their creative team on research projects.

BEAPworks was established as a joint initiative between the Biennale of Electronic Arts, Perth and ArtsWA from a desire to generate high-end research in the area of electronic arts. This aspiration was timely, as artwork such as this is can fall between traditional art funding categories. Funding of up to $10 000 were granted for projects that utilised emerging technologies such as digital, time-based, broadband, screen-based and biological art. It is hoped that the BEAPworks grant and exhibition will assist the development of a supportive electronic culture in Perth.

BEAP is supported by the Visual Arts and Craft Strategy, an initiative of the Australian, State and Territory Governments and the Government of Western Australia through ArtsWA in association with Lotterywest.

Participating Artists:

Mark Cypher
Cat Hope
Jo Law with 3d compositions by Hilary Bunt and Raoul Marks
Cameron Merton and Yvette Merton
Nina Sellars in collaboration with Iain Sweetman and Gareth Lockett
Cynthia Verspaget

BEAPworks is a joint initiative between the Biennale of Electronic Arts, Perth and ArtsWA.

BEAP

A set of logos incorporating ArtsWA, Government of Western Australia and LotteryWest supported

The logo of The Visual Arts and Craft Strategy

BEAP is supported by the Visual Arts and Craft Strategy, an initiative of the Australian, State and Territory Governments; the Government of Western Australia through ArtsWA in association with Lotterywest.

Media-Space logo

tura logo

Western Australian Interactive Virtual Envorinments Centre logo

Kirribilli Catering logo

The BEAPworks exhibition is supported by Curtin University of Technology. IVEC, Tura New Music, Media Space and Kirrabilli Café


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