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Curtin University of Technology
John Curtin Gallery

Past exhibitions
2009

 


 

A Series of Short Stories from the Curtin University Art Collection, Tracey Moffatt and Patrick Doherty
18 Novemeber - 18 December
Foyer

The third and last installament of the Short Stories Series features Something More by Tracey Moffatt. Created in 1989, this work consists of a series of nine large scale cibachrome prints that evoke a haunting narrative; confrontational and deliberate. This work is one of the highlights in the Curtin Art Collection and will be complimented by Doomed, a video piece, also by Moffatt.

A large untitled work by Patrick Doherty will also be on show. Doherty's work also presents a narrative and this will be the first time that it has been exhibited in the John Curtin Gallery.

The third and last installament of the Short Stories Series features Something More by Tracey Moffatt. Created in 1989, this work consists of a series of nine large scale cibachrome prints that evoke a haunting narrative; confrontational and deliberate. This work is one of the highlights in the Curtin Art Collection and will be complimented by Doomed, a video piece, also by Moffatt.

A large untitled work by Patrick Doherty will also be on show. Doherty's work also presents a narrative and this will be the first time that it has been exhibited in the John Curtin Gallery.

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A Series of Short Stories from the Curtin University Art Collection, Indigenous Works
26 October - 13 November
Foyer

This is the second selection in the series and features works by Indigenous artists, including Rover Thomas, Ronnie Tjampitjinpa, Mitjili Naparrula and Long Tom Tjapanangka.

Tjampitjimpa image
Ronnie Tjampitjinpa, Tingari Dreaming, 2006, acrylic on linen, 183 x 153cm, Curtin University of Technology Art Collection, © the artist 2009 licensed by Aboriginal Artists Agency

Tjampitjinpa image2
Ronnie Tjampitjinpa, Tarrkuna, 2001, acrylic on canvas, 305 x 170cm, Curtin University of Technology Art Collection, © the artist 2009 licensed by Aboriginal Artists Agency

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A Series of short stories from the Curtin University of Technology Art Collection
21 September - 16 October

Foyer

This selection of works is the first in the series and highlights artists who have drawn upon different aspects of nature as inspiration for their practice. The abstract nature of these works encourages the viewer to experience the artists' evocative use of materials, colour, space and texture.
This intimate exhibition, includes works by widely-recognised contemporary artists Howard Taylor, Brian Blanchflower, Marion Borgelt and Gunter Christmann.

view of foyer image
A series of short stories from the Curtin University Art Collection, installation view, JCG foyer, 2009

Marion Borgelt image
Marion Borgelt, Liquid light: 33 degrees, acrylic, canvas, pins, wood, 2004-2006, gift of the Artist through the Cultural Gifts Program 2008, installation view, 2009

Brian Blanchflower image 1
Brian Blanchflower, Fire towers, synthetic polymer paint and chalk on canvas, 1982, purchased 1982 with assistance from the Visual Arts Board of the Australia Council, installation view, 2009

Brian Blanchflower image 2
Brian Blanchflower, In 2 parts (Equivalents), acrylic and oils on flax canvas, acrylic and pumice powder on hessian, 1993-1994, gift of the Artist through the Cultural Gifts Program 2003, installation view, 2009

howard taylor image
Howard Taylor, Flower figure, oil on plywood and tin, 1978, gift of Drs Johanna Lagerberg and Stephen Swift through the Cultural Gifts Program 2007, installation view, 2009

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Cathy_Nalda opening
Nalda Searles - Drifting in My Own Land, Cathy Blanchflower and Audacity of Faith opening night, JCG, 18 June 2009

Nalda Searles - Drifting in My Own Land

19 June - 30 August 2009

The national tour of Nalda Searles - Drifting in My Own Land is supported and managed by ART ON THE MOVE.
The exhibition is supported by Visions Australia, an Australian Government program supporting touring exhibitions by providing funding assistance for the development and touring of cultural material across Australia.

Nalda Searles has been practising her craft for nearly 30 years and is an innovator in the use of native fibres and found objects from the environment for the creation of fibre-textiles, sculptures and installations. This acclaimed Western Australian artist explores notions of identity in relation to the physical and social landscape through this comprehensive range of more than 21 works. Featured in this exhibition are works that utilise recycled clothing and textiles, hair,  plant  materials, meadow hay, found and salvaged objects combined with seemingly endless stitching.

 

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO PURCHASE A COPY OF THE DVD - Nalda Searles: A Stitching of Words, PLEASE DOWNLOAD YOUR ORDER FORM HERE
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alda searles image3
Grass Skull 2, 2008, 120 x 220 x 160mm, common fodder, poly thread, photo: Eva Fernandez

nalda install 1
Nalda Searles - Drifting in My Own Land, installation view, JCG, 2009

 

Nalda Searles image2
Grass Funnel, 2007, 310 x 380mm, common fodder, red wool blanket, cotton thread, photo: Eva Fernandez

 

nalda install2
Nalda Searles - Drifting in My Own Land, installation view, JCG, 2009

 

Nalda Searles image
Kangaroo Couple, 1995-2008, White: 1730 mm x 560 mm x 390 mm, Brown: 1900 mm x 660 mm x 510 mm, wool dresses, plant dyed silk, xanthorrhoea spathes,  silk strings, common fodder, cotton mannequins, photo: Eva Fernandez

 

nalda install 3
Nalda Searles - Drifting in My Own Land, installation view, JCG, 2009

 

nalda install5
Nalda Searles - Drifting in My Own Land, installation view, JCG, 2009

 

nalda install 6
Nalda Searles - Drifting in My Own Land, installation view, JCG, 2009

 

 

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cathy blanchflower

19 June - 30 August 2009

 

Cathy Blanchflower is increasingly recognised as one of Australia's most important painters, undertaking her work over the last 17 years with a determination and resilience that has strengthened her reputation in recent years.  Since departing Perth in the mid 1990's, Blanchflower has lived and worked in both New York and Melbourne.

Presenting 25 works, dating from 1992 to the present, this exhibition is the first survey of paintings by Blanchflower ever seen in Australia, featuring many works that have never been shown in Perth before.

Cathy Blanchflower image
Lyrr, 2008, 122cm x 122cm, oil on canvas, Collection of the Artist, Courtesy of the Artist & Karen Woodbury Gallery, Melbourne

 

Cathy install1
cathy blanchflower, installation view, JCG, 2009

 

Cathy install 2
cathy blanchflower, installation view, JCG, 2009

Aster image
Cathy Blanchflower, Aster XI, 2004, 122 x 122cm, oil on canvas, Private Collection, Melbourne, Courtesy of the Artist & Karen Woodbury Gallery, Melbourne

 

Cahy install 3
cathy blanchflower, installation view, JCG, 2009

 

Cathy install 5
cathy blanchflower, installation view, JCG, 2009

 

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dOFa09
1 - 31 May

dOFa09 is an exhibition of works by graduating Doctor of Creative Arts, Master of Creative Arts and Master of Arts students from the Department of Art, Curtin University of Technology. The exhibition showcases a diverse range of artistic backgrounds and interests, from painting to large-scale audio-visual installations and digital artworks.

Participating artists: Roger Goodman, Kirsten Hudson, Elizabeth Hammond, Lindsay Harris, Rhett Jones, Rachel Kierath, Alana McVeigh, Adrian Reeve, Mio Takagi and Marzena Topka.

Roger Goodman
Master of Art (Visual Art)

I present prints connected with research into the use of circles and circular forms in art and where there may be a reference to spirituality.
 
Sophisticated spiritual symbolism has been created by mathematical manipulation and religious dogma from basic symbols that by their very nature remain embedded in the human psyche. Perhaps the most basic of all is the circle, a representation of the sun and the moon. Vassily Kandinsky's groundbreaking 1911 book Concerning The Spiritual In Art revealed that spirituality exists in many forms of art other than the religious and he expressly stated..."A circle is a living wonder...I have preferred to use the circle...not for...it's geometrical characteristics but rather my strong feeling of the inner force of the circle in its countless variations".
 
My prints are mainly presented in artists book form and are loosely related to different periods of art history. They are Minimalist in nature, attempting to achieve a maximum effect with a minimum of adornment. Implicit in the work is a measure of asymmetry that will cause the viewer to question the composition, together with the inclusion of subtle effects and textures to invite closer inspection. Coloured grounds are produced by multiple layers of inks and overprinted with 'controlled random' etchings on steel plates.

Roger Goodman image
Roger Goodman, etching on monoprint with embossed endpapers on BFK paper, book cover debossed at front, 51 x 94cm open, photo: Tony Nathan

 

Elizabeth Hammond
Master of Art (Visual Art)

The Alice in Wonderland of Drawing (or Incongruity Creating Curiosity...)

Elizabeth Hammond uses drawing to investigate seemingly conflicting objects and animals. She brings together on a page, incongruous objects and animals in order to highlight the inherent qualities of both, and their place of belonging. Through these incongruous compositions, an unusual narrative is created for the viewer... Hammond chooses domestic kitchen utensils as the subjects of her drawings. Juxtaposed alongside these utensils, she draws animals, as the meeting of animals and a domestic object hardly ever happens. This creates the incongruity that is so intriguing for the viewer. She designs the composition to appear harmonious, and plays with the idea of 'belonging' as animals and objects belong in very different settings. Her intention is for them to appear to belong together. She employs a deliberately redundant technique of realistic drawing to reference nostalgic childhood stories that linger on in the minds of us all... Hammond is interested in drawing the viewer into her way of seeing the world, a naive, childlike view where one takes nothing for granted and everything is new and interesting; an Alice like wonder at the beauty of unlikely objects...

Elizabeth Hammond image
Elizabeth Hammond, The Tales Series I, 2008, 2Bpencil on paper, 100 x 180 cm

Lindsay Harris
Master of Art (Visual Art)

I am a Noongar artist and my interest has always been discovering ways of representing my land (Kwolyin). I see through my eyes and memories of Kwolyin and of the surrounding districts where I once lived. When making my art, I introduce both memories and images of granite rocks, tracks and salt lakes. As a Noongar, I have and share a special relationship to the country of my forebears. Underpinning this relationship is the respect for my country and my involvement in its care and representation. I feel that my art has to give a sense of intimacy and connection to my boodja  (land). Through my painting I invite people to go on a journey back to my land and see and understand it, as I see it. My aim is to make a personal journey deeper into the significance of my lands and landscape. I want to depict my ideas about land and space through my art.

lindsay harris image
Lindsay Harris, Landscape 1, 2008/9, resin, pigment on hemp, 570 x 590 mm

Kirsten Hudson
Doctor of Philosophy (Art)

Self-indulgence, exaggeration and excess are my specialty. Grandiose statements, a healthy sense of narcissism plus a fascination with risk and contradiction, allow me a certain level of control and of course, I mustn't forget, an obsession with orchestrating instances of destruction sums me up quite nicely. However, this has meant that to many I am a constant source of concern and irritation. To "fix" this affliction, my mother told me that I should sit down and write a list of all my faults, so that I might realise and then come to terms with all of my issues (I think she got this from one of the numerous 12-step programs that she has been enrolled in over the years). She said that this would encourage me to "change my ways" and would persuade me to 'improve myself' such that I might stop creating situations of "self sabotage" and start striving for a "more 'pure' and 'honest' state of existence". So to keep her happy I did. But all that did for me was to encourage more of the same, but hey, I admit that my sense of reality is narcissistically warped.



kirsten hudson image
Kirsten Hudson, Falter, 2005, still from DVD, film credit: Sarah Jane Pell

Rhett Jones
Master of Art

This project pays lip service to the utopian and aesthetic aspirations of twentieth century art and design through the development of visual cues and idea semblance.
The objects are part abstract and part serviceable and in a sense are in-between objects that do not always facilitate their associated identity but often impede it. 
Reducing an exploration of the cultural texts that surround modernism to that of broken visual citations and insincere connections the objects look, more or less, like modern art.
Feigning a serious dialogue with the constitutions of art and design the works on the one hand produce the ideas of function and aesthetics while on the other they produce absence and overlook crucial elements.
Through the employment of a part real/part faux approach towards the realisaton of iconic works the project generates a hoax quality in which the works are unable to realistically reinforce themselves on all levels due to the presence of contradictory information.

Rhett Jones image
Rhett Jones, Untitled, 2008, wood, paint, glue, screws, filler, 470x840x550

Rachel Keirath
Master of Art (Visual Art)

The impetus behind this 'environment' of documentation, as this body of work exists, is the desire to honour process... and present works that are tracking the development and life of the series of photographic images, producing works that are significantly durational presentations. They become works that exist within a state of performance in order to honour the continual evolution of the work.
This process of which I speak explores the notion of Impermanence...the continual cycle of matter locked within a process of change. All matter exists within a state of flux; a state of evolution; a measure of the existence of change: be it measured in terms of 'growth' or in terms of 'decay'... Forever evolving; Never concrete.
The irony of the space between the still frame (the photographic image) freezing only a moment in time of something, and the actuality that all matter is the opposite to concrete and undergoing a process of change greatly intrigues me.
Whilst I do gauge the level of intervention from the artist for these works, it is more important to speak of the notion of facilitation.  I see myself as facilitator, not artist, in this respect (a role that seems pleasantly absent from ties with artist/ego). It is about facilitating not only the process of impermanence on a pragmatic and physical level, but also the philosophical lived experience of Impermanence for the collaborators of these works (and consequently the 'subjects' of this collection of images) and for myself, as we monitor and visually experience physical self-representations evolving before us, through this collaborative, communal journey.
This environment of work is a live-recording of the events of the 'lifecycle' of each artwork, reminiscent of the notion of the Hermeneutic Circle, where all aspects of the whole (the 'environment' of work) are required to understand the complete meaning inherent in the project.

Process: a Verb not a Noun.           

 

Rachel keirath image
Rachel Kierath, from the "neverendingproject series", 2009, installation view

Alana McVeigh
Master of Art (Visual Art)

"Beauty finds its finest expression in static forms, in which a fragment
of action or movement finds equilibrium and repose, and for which
simplicity of expression is more suitable than a wealth of detail".

                                                                                                    Umberto Eco

My work examines the simplicity of form, a sense of stillness and an enquiry into aesthetics.
Within my quest to identify notions of particular aesthetics and beauty, I examine the rich history, classical standards and aesthetic sensibility inherent within some Eastern cultures.
I have chosen porcelain as my main medium for its superior qualities of translucency, and pure white colour. These qualities enhance the aesthetic qualities and sensory associations I am striving to achieve within my work.

Alana VcVeigh image
Alana McVeigh, Trace Series, 2008, porcelain

Adrian Reeve
Master of Art (Visual Art)


Space and its virtual representation. The perception of that space from an exterior perspective. The shifts that become possible in the deployment of digital architecture. The possible extensions of reality submerged in the virtual environment. A fluctuation of temporal experience of location emerges from the virtual. The unspecified location of the viewer in accordance to the construction of an ephemeral space.
The position of the individual is therefore implicated in the delineation of the material. The creation of an objectifying prehension registers the event in relation to the subject, the event becomes a function of the public domain whilst the immediacy, individuality and novelty express an element of private subjectivity. It is the nexus of prehension between the subject and the object that reveals the intensity of the event, making it at once public and private, actual and virtual, potential and real. The prehension explicates a participation in the becoming of events and the subjective sense of becoming.

 

Adrian Reeve image
Adrian Reeve, Libx, 2008, digital still (detail), dimensions variable

Mio Takagi
Master of Art (Visual Art)

My current artwork "Days of Future Past" is a part of Real Fake project, which deals with the idea of fake and hyperreality. This Real Fake project revolves around the concept of an illusion, especially simulacrum. Days of Future Past is an installation which imitates museum located in a fictional narrative. The fictional narrative of this installation is such that the future civilian building the museum displays this twenty-first century as an archaeological discovery. This narrative is set in post-apocalyptic period, where the future civilization hallows our remnants as lost technologies (which they do not understand). My aim for this project is to have both a dynamic narrative (concept) and subtle aesthetics which allow the audience to have an image of the future which does not exist.

 

mio Takagi image
Mio Takagi, Shrine, 2008, mixed media, steel pipes, foam, salt and paint, 1870 x 970 x x870 mm

 

Marzena Topka
Master of Creative Arts (Art)

How can a sense of destabilization be activated through installation?

The aspect of space I am interested in alludes to a virtual place, a topology that incorporates junctions between places we encounter and the way we respond to them.  That is the affective space our bodies inhabit. There is no continuity between materials chosen and the starting point. Selected materials are not usually associated with the objective context in which they are initially found, for example in offices, architectural firms, or laboratories.  Thus misplaced from spaces reserved for geometry and misused for purposes other than their practical application they become unfamiliar and their presence can re-examined. In that way, the rational and the irrational are connected in my work.  The moment at which the inherent qualities of materials, enter the work the irrational enters with it. There are distortions and displacements that occur as a result of these material interjections that situate these objects in everyday life. 

Perhaps it's as simple as creating spaces to think, to feel, to be...

 

Congratulations to MARZENA TOPKA who is the 11th Recipient of the Galerie Düsseldorf / Curtin University. Department of Art, Post Graduate Scholarship Award.
Visit www.galeriedusseldorf.com.au for further details.

 


Marzena image
Marzena Topka, Various Tensions, 2009, video still, 6min47sec

 

 

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of art & music

13 February - 3 April 2009

A Perth International Arts Festival Event

of art & music brings together a select group of artists from around the world and celebrates the influences that visual art and music can have upon each other. This groundbreaking exhibition showcases outstanding examples of this spirit of communication across a wide range of media.

These influences are manifest in different ways, from collaboration - as in the compelling video installation Paris Requiem by artist Adam Geczy and composer Peter Sculthorpe; to inspiration - in the form of Janet Cardiff's magnificent sound installation The Forty Part Motet, recreating the sculptural sound of Thomas Tallis' renaissance polyphony. Roger Smalley's work for large orchestra, Diptych (Homage to Brian Blanchflower) 1990 - 1991 was inspired by his profound reaction to a survey of Brian Blanchflower's paintings exhibited during the 1990 Festival of Perth.

of art & music explores the diversity of this confluence of the visual and the audible from the monumental to the sublime.

 

Janet Cardiff
Forty Part Motet

The Forty Part Motet is a beautifully absorbing work where Cardiff has reworked an innovative piece of choral music by one of the most influential English composers of the sixteenth century, Thomas Tallis. Spem in Alium is a motet composed in 1573 for eight choirs of five voices.  It is seen as one of history's most emotive compositions and is believed to be written to mark the fortieth birthday of Queen Elizabeth I.  Cardiff worked with the Salisbury Cathedral Choir to record each of the forty voices separately while they performed Spem in Alium.  Each track is then played through a single speaker to isolate each singer and to dislocate the seemingly unified voices of the choir.

Forty Part Motet image

Forty Part Motet image
Janet Cardiff, The Forty Part Motet 2001, (a re-working of Spem in Alium Nunquam Habui 1573, by Thomas Tallis). Originally produced by Field Art Projects with the Arts Council of England, the Salisbury Festival, BALTIC Gateshead, The New Art Gallery Walsall, and the NOW Festival Nottingham. Sung by Salisbury Cathedral Choir. Recording and Postproduction by SoundMoves. Edited by George Bures Miller. Produced by Field Art Projects. Installation views, John Curtin Gallery, 2009

 

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Adam Geczy and Peter Sculthorpe
Paris Requiem

Sculthorpe and Geczy have collaborated on many works since 2002. Paris Requiem, produced in 2006, is a compelling video installation that Geczy has referred to as their 'most technically and conceptually ambitious' collaboration to date. Although one work, it comprises of six discrete video 'meditations' that correspond to the six movements of Sculthorpe's Requiem for Solo Cello.  The footage in the work features the side of Paris that is largely unseen - the non-tourist partsunaesthetic banlieues.

Adam Geczy image 1
Adam Geczy and Peter Sculthorpe, Paris Requiem, 2006, video still

Adam Geczy image 2
Adam Geczy and Peter Sculthorpe, Paris Requiem, 2006, video still

Geczy image
Adam Geczy and Peter Sculthorpe, Paris Requiem, 2006, installation view, John Curtin Gallery, 2009

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Brian Blanchflower and Roger Smalley
Tursiops, Glimpses (An Earth History) and Diptych (Homage to Brian Blanchflower)

Roger Smalley, internationally renowned composer, has always been attracted to the work of Brian Blanchflower and in 1990 he decided to compose a piece of music based on Blanchflower's work.  The result was Diptych composed in response to the darkness of Blanchflower's sculptural installation, Tursiops and the brightness of the colour and texture in the painting, Glimpses (An Earth History) both created in the 1980's.  Smalley created a pair of orchestral pieces that represent dark and light. 

 

Blanchflower install
Brian Blanchflower, Tursiops, 1981-1983, oils, bitumen, canvas, hessian, metal, wood, reed boxes, ropes, sand, wax and dolphin skull, 235 x 680 x 380cm, State Art Collection Art Gallery of Western Australia, Gift of Brian Blanchflower, 2006, and Glimpses (An Earth History), 1986-1987, oils on gesso on polyester/cotton canvas, 189 x 658cm, The Holmes a Court Collection, installation view JCG, 2009


Tursiops install
Brian Blanchflower, Tursiops, 1981-1983, oils, bitumen, canvas, hessian, metal, wood, reed boxes, ropes, sand, wax and dolphin skull, 235 x 680 x 380cm, State Art Collection Art Gallery of Western Australia, Gift of Brian Blanchflower, 2006, installation view JCG, 2009

 

glimpses install view
Brian Blanchflower, Glimpses (An Earth History), 1986-1987, oils on gesso on polyester/cotton canvas, 189 x 658cm, The Holmes a Court Collection, installation view JCG, 2009

 

Glimpses detail
Brian Blanchflower, Glimpses (An Earth History), detail, 1986-1987, oils on gesso on polyester/cotton canvas, 189 x 658cm, The Holmes a Court Collection, photo: Brian Blanchflower

 

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